Author Archives: Marin Coast Guide

KWMR Events Schedule 2015-2016

 

KWMR: Quartet San Francisco

Sat. Dec 5: House Concert for an intimate group in Point Reyes Station. With the purchase of a $100 ticket to this event you are a Sponsor and enable QSF to perform the school education assembly. Join others for a special evening in a beautiful home. Limited to 40 attendees and tickets are going fast. The concert begins at 8:00 pm and desserts and beverages are provided. Please contact Amanda if you would like to attend. 415-663-8068, Ext 104 or amanda@kwmr.org

Sunday, December 6: Quartet San Francisco in concert at Commonweal in Bolinas. Reserve your seat HERE. This will be a great show from 2pm – 4pm. The show is free, but donations may be made to support KWMR at the event. We appreciate your support.

Quartet San Francisco will be performing a special school music assembly on Monday, December 7th!

Save the Date:

KWMR is a media sponsor for the Wandering Reel Film Festival on Friday,November 20th at the Bolinas Community Center. Music and Lights following the film with local performers Katilyn Aurelia Smith, Danny Vitali and lights by Jeff Manson. For more information click HERE.

KWMR participating in the Dance Palace Holiday Craft Fair the weekend of December 4 – 7, 2015.

Sweethearts of the Radio at the Dance Palace Community Center on Saturday, February 13.

Spring Pledge Drive – March 2015

Eat My Heart Out Supper Club, Saturday, April 23 at the Peace Barn in Bolinas!

And on the eve of Veterans Day, KWMR would like to thank all who have served our country in uniform.

Bolinas and Dogtown

 

BOLINAS

 

Seaside Bolinas is the oldest town in Coastal Marin. It is famously an eccentric and tolerant town with a community that includes descendants of early Bolinas families, artists and writers, biologists, high tech innovators, social and environmental activists, renowned organic food producers and more.

The turn-off to Bolinas from Highway One is at the head of the Bolinas Lagoon, keeping the lagoon on your left. Parking in town is problematic and the dead end main street makes turning around difficult. Alternatively arriving by the West Marin Stage public transportation can free you and townspeople from parking frustration. Or add to your adventure by turning right on Mesa Road, parking in the roomy gravel lot by the fire station, then stroll across the road to a pleasant downhill path through a eucalyptus grove. The town is dog friendly but please bring only well-socialized dogs to Bolinas. No camping or fires are allowed on the beach. Residents ask visitors to be thoughtful and respect their community, beaches and environment.

The town’s history stretches back to Native Americans followed by Spanish Californios, both settled on the sunny flatland by today’s schoolhouse. The Gold Rush brought logging, ranching and an economy dependent on maritime transportation until the 1930s. From 1914-1990s Marconi / RCA made global communication history here. Besides a literary Renaissance, the 1970s were pivotal for community commitment to preserve small town Bolinas and its wildlife-rich environment. Most of downtown was built between 1850 and 1920. The Schooner Saloon (Smiley’s) dates back to the early days of logging, and Bolinas Market has changed little since reopening after the 1906 earthquake. Next to the historic blacksmith shop/garage is Bo-Gas, one of only two gas stations in Coastal Marin. It is open 24/7 by credit card and sales contribute to Bolinas Land Trust, a non-profit providing affordable housing. Public restrooms are located in the downtown park and another by the tennis court.

In addition to savoring nature, hiking or the small beach, Bolinas offers an honor-system bookstore and farm stand, a hardware store with unusual gifts, second-hand stores, world-source gifts, a library, a few B&Bs and a few motel rooms 
at the saloon. For eating, emphasis here is on delicious locally harvested food. There are sandwiches at natural foods Bolinas People’s Store and Bolinas Market, sit down at Coast Café, and interesting new food venues are opening. Don’t miss the wildlife artist’s gallery, changing shows at the rentable Bolinas Gallery and the outstanding Bolinas Museum of fine art and local history.

The community center has a
 busy schedule of classes and events, Commonweal’s New School offers stimulating public talks and the Maritime Radio Historical Society offers RCA radio station tours by appointment. There are surfboard rentals, surfing lessons and supplies. In the historic barn, next to Bolinas Museum, The Surf Shop sells comfortable clothes now, but the owner, Buzz, was the founder of the very first surf shop (including building surfboards) between the Golden Gate Bridge and Canada.

There is no highway sign and the town has a reputation for discouraging visitors, but if you find your way here, you will find the community is friendly, interesting and full of independent-minded creative people.

Courtesy of Elia Haworth, Curator of Coastal Marin Art & History, Bolinas Museum

 

Dogtown – the first Bolinas

Just north of the Bolinas turn off is the little settlement of Dogtown. This was the original Bolinas and entry to Rancho Las Baulines (established about 1834) whose boundaries defined the township until 1916. The lagoon side town’s location today was just called “The Point”, the place where schooners were loaded with lumber, dairy, farm products and people to transport to San Francisco.

The Gold Rush brought thousands
of immigrants into the tiny San Francisco and created an insatiable need for lumber to build a city. In 1850 hundreds
of men descended on Rancho Baulines to fell the primeval redwood forests and turn the ancient oaks and pines into firewood. Sawmills were built and the rowdy community of Baulines sprang up. Yankees simplified the spelling to Bolinas. In 1865, newspaper editor Ai Barney visited Bolinas and described it as “quite a settlement, and is known under the cogomen of “Dogtown”– being so called, we presume, from the immense number of canines which infest the place”. Dogs were for hunting bear and deer. He described it’s wagon-its businesses and five or six houses. A few of those buildings remain today including the first Bolinas schoolhouse. Three copper mines opened nearby and Bolinas was briefly renamed Copper Town, but mining failed. Eventually busy commerce at The Point drew the township of Bolinas.

The name Dogtown-Bolinas stuck for the settlement, much to the frustration of resident men who believed the name Dogtown hindered attracting marriageable women. On December 31, 1868, a town meeting was held, “to deliberate on the expediency of the proposition to make sausage of all the dogs and chose a more virtuous, modest and sweet-scented word of a warbling sound as a name more suitable for our thrifty town of decent inhabitants.” Dogtown-Bolinas became “Woodville.”

Woodville faded into a neighborhood of fewer residents and locals continued to call it Dogtown for over 100 years. Finally a local resident petitioned the Board of Supervisors of Marin County to restore the name. By unanimous resolution in April, 1976–it officially became Dogtown.

Courtesy of the Bolinas Museum

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

BOLINAS

 

Seaside Bolinas is the oldest town in Coastal Marin. It is famously an eccentric and tolerant town with a community that includes descendants of early Bolinas families, artists and writers, biologists, high tech innovators, social and environmental activists, renowned organic food producers and more.

The turn-off to Bolinas from Highway One is at the head of the Bolinas Lagoon, keeping the lagoon on your left. Parking in town is problematic and the dead end main street makes turning around difficult. Alternatively arriving by the West Marin Stage public transportation can free you and townspeople from parking frustration. Or add to your adventure by turning right on Mesa Road, parking in the roomy gravel lot by the fire station, then stroll across the road to a pleasant downhill path through a eucalyptus grove. The town is dog friendly but please bring only well-socialized dogs to Bolinas. No camping or fires are allowed on the beach. Residents ask visitors to be thoughtful and respect their community, beaches and environment.

The town’s history stretches back to Native Americans followed by Spanish Californios, both settled on the sunny flatland by today’s schoolhouse. The Gold Rush brought logging, ranching and an economy dependent on maritime transportation until the 1930s. From 1914-1990s Marconi / RCA made global communication history here. Besides a literary Renaissance, the 1970s were pivotal for community commitment to preserve small town Bolinas and its wildlife-rich environment. Most of downtown was built between 1850 and 1920. The Schooner Saloon (Smiley’s) dates back to the early days of logging, and Bolinas Market has changed little since reopening after the 1906 earthquake. Next to the historic blacksmith shop/garage is Bo-Gas, one of only two gas stations in Coastal Marin. It is open 24/7 by credit card and sales contribute to Bolinas Land Trust, a non-profit providing affordable housing. Public restrooms are located in the downtown park and another by the tennis court.

In addition to savoring nature, hiking or the small beach, Bolinas offers an honor-system bookstore and farm stand, a hardware store with unusual gifts, second-hand stores, world-source gifts, a library, a few B&Bs and a few motel rooms 
at the saloon. For eating, emphasis here is on delicious locally harvested food. There are sandwiches at natural foods Bolinas People’s Store and Bolinas Market, sit down at Coast Café, and interesting new food venues are opening. Don’t miss the wildlife artist’s gallery, changing shows at the rentable Bolinas Gallery and the outstanding Bolinas Museum of fine art and local history.

The community center has a
 busy schedule of classes and events, Commonweal’s New School offers stimulating public talks and the Maritime Radio Historical Society offers RCA radio station tours by appointment. There are surfboard rentals, surfing lessons and supplies. In the historic barn, next to Bolinas Museum, The Surf Shop sells comfortable clothes now, but the owner, Buzz, was the founder of the very first surf shop (including building surfboards) between the Golden Gate Bridge and Canada.

There is no highway sign and the town has a reputation for discouraging visitors, but if you find your way here, you will find the community is friendly, interesting and full of independent-minded creative people.

Courtesy of Elia Haworth, Curator of Coastal Marin Art & History, Bolinas Museum

 

Dogtown – the first Bolinas

Just north of the Bolinas turn off is the little settlement of Dogtown. This was the original Bolinas and entry to Rancho Las Baulines (established about 1834) whose boundaries defined the township until 1916. The lagoon side town’s location today was just called “The Point”, the place where schooners were loaded with lumber, dairy, farm products and people to transport to San Francisco.

The Gold Rush brought thousands
of immigrants into the tiny San Francisco and created an insatiable need for lumber to build a city. In 1850 hundreds
of men descended on Rancho Baulines to fell the primeval redwood forests and turn the ancient oaks and pines into firewood. Sawmills were built and the rowdy community of Baulines sprang up. Yankees simplified the spelling to Bolinas. In 1865, newspaper editor Ai Barney visited Bolinas and described it as “quite a settlement, and is known under the cogomen of “Dogtown”– being so called, we presume, from the immense number of canines which infest the place”. Dogs were for hunting bear and deer. He described it’s wagon-its businesses and five or six houses. A few of those buildings remain today including the first Bolinas schoolhouse. Three copper mines opened nearby and Bolinas was briefly renamed Copper Town, but mining failed. Eventually busy commerce at The Point drew the township of Bolinas.

The name Dogtown-Bolinas stuck for the settlement, much to the frustration of resident men who believed the name Dogtown hindered attracting marriageable women. On December 31, 1868, a town meeting was held, “to deliberate on the expediency of the proposition to make sausage of all the dogs and chose a more virtuous, modest and sweet-scented word of a warbling sound as a name more suitable for our thrifty town of decent inhabitants.” Dogtown-Bolinas became “Woodville.”

Woodville faded into a neighborhood of fewer residents and locals continued to call it Dogtown for over 100 years. Finally a local resident petitioned the Board of Supervisors of Marin County to restore the name. By unanimous resolution in April, 1976–it officially became Dogtown.

Courtesy of the Bolinas Museum